Island of Misfit Toys

This week’s guest columnist is Dr. Matthew Morgan, a Family Practice resident at the University Hospital and Clinics here in Lafayette.

I have fond memories of Sunday dinner at my grandfather’s.  We followed the same routine: mom brought the potato salad, grandmother made fried chicken, grandfather made the coffee.  And we’d play games: dad liked horseshoes, my brother… lawn darts.  Remember lawn darts?  They were comically-enlarged versions of traditional darts with a weighted end, to be tossed in the air at a target on the grass.  You may not remember them because of the Consumer Product Safety Commission, a government agency that banned them after several children were injured, some critically.

Many toys have been removed from the market over the years.  Some people think “they’re taking childhoods away from us!” Perhaps, but lawn darts had a proven record of hazards, and some toys prior to the Safety Commission’s founding were just flat-out ridiculous.  Look up the Gilbert Atomic Energy Lab, a toy marketed in 1950 by Alfred Gilbert (inventor of the more popular, and safe, Erector Set).  This set contained actual uranium ore which, besides producing cool effects, brought low levels of radiation into the household, and could cause radiation burns if handled improperly.  One play suggestion: secret the ore somewhere in the house, and play hide-and-seek with the included geiger counter.

Another obvious benefit of this agency was the removal from the market of Aqua Dots, an arts-and-crafts toy with beads manufactured in China.  After several toddlers were hospitalized with comas after ingesting the beads, they found that their chemical coating contained GHB. Popularly known as the “date rape” drug, GHB is particularly toxic to children.

A more routine responsibility of the agency is assigning age ranges for toys.  There’s a common misconception that the age suggestions are based on intellect or maturity level.  Thus parents buy the toy or game for their child who’s younger than the age range, thinking that their kid is advanced enough to enjoy it.  However, the age range is actually for safety’s sake, particulary for kids under age 3.  It’s decided by rigorous testing to assess the choking risk of small parts.

I recall when my brothers and I got our go-kart.  Back then, a go-kart was a glorified piece of sheet metal with wheels bolted on each corner, one of which attached to a small motor.  I vaguely remember a steering mechanism, but we ran into trees and dirt piles so much I can’t be certain.  It’s easy to remember the safety features though, because there were none.  Of course our parents didn’t make us wear helmets either.  I carry a reminder of that go-kart on my right elbow, a shiny white scar from when I jumped off while riding on the back, one thing mom did specifically warn us not to do.

Things have changed since then.  Go-karts and other motorized toys have become more complex.  While there’s been some focus on safety, they’ve also gotten more powerful, with new and different dangers.  With advancement in battery technology, there’s even electric dirt bikes for kids, though their size and speed don’t necessarily correlate with age-appropriateness.

Like we discussed above, the Consumer Product Safety Commission sets age levels for toys and games.  Though they base these assessments on proven algorithms, the science is still evolving concerning motorized riding toys.  For example, many of these are intended for use on dirt roads and isolated driveways.  They are unsafe on paved streets, particularly top-heavy and overpowered ATVs.  Another consideration is use of these toys by children with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder.  These kids have  decreased attentiveness and a penchant for risk-taking, so it’s important to keep in mind your child’s potential for accidents.  And bad injuries happen with these toys to any child, ADHD or not.

Parents can limit the use of these devices, ensure safety measures, and purchase them with their child’s capabilities in mind.  Helmets, elbow, knee, and wrist pads, and boots are helpful.  Designate safe areas for play, keeping kids off roads where they’re hard for cars to see and avoid.  Set use hours with the best visibility, for kids to see hazards and the hazards (cars) to see them.  Be there when your kids are riding or using potentially dangerous items.  We see castastrophes all the time in the Pediatric ER; don’t let your child be one of them.

 

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